May 10, 2013

Nothing Could Possibly Go Wrong Blog Tour: Guest Post and Giveaway



Today on the blog we have a guest post from Faith Erin Hicks, illustrator of the YA graphic novel, Nothing Can Possibly Go Wrong. We are happy to be a part of the blog tour, and are delighted to bring you an entertaining guest post which is followed by a giveaway of the book! I haven't been able to read it yet, but I have heard nothing but great things as there are quite a few positive reviews from my blogger friends. I do have a copy of my very own and I look forward to reading it shortly. Before we get started on the guest post, a little background information about the book:

Also, I want to thank First Second Books for asking us to be a part of this tour!


Publisher: First Second Books
Release Date: May 7th, 2013
Pages: 288


Book Description: You wouldn’t expect Nate and Charlie to be friends. Charlie’s the laid-back captain of the basketball team, and Nate is the neurotic, scheming president of the robotics club. But they are friends, however unlikely—until Nate declares war on the cheerleaders. At stake is funding that will either cover a robotics competition or new cheerleading uniforms—but not both.


It's only going to get worse: after both parties are stripped of their funding on grounds of abominable misbehavior, Nate enrolls the club's robot in a battlebot competition in a desperate bid for prize money. Bad sportsmanship? Sure. Chainsaws? Why not. Running away from home on Thanksgiving to illicitly enter a televised robot death match? Of course!



In Faith Erin Hicks' and Prudence Shen's world of high school class warfare and robot death matches, Nothing can possibly go wrong.


Guest Post by Faith Erin Hicks

Why Write YA comics?

            Hi, I'm Faith Erin Hicks, and I write and draw comics for a living. I've been making comics regularly since posting my very first comic page online in 1999, back in the dark ages of the internet. That comic, an angsty, often clumsily drawn long form comic strikingly derivative of Buffy the Vampire Slayer was called Demonology 101, and when I finished drawing it (and graduated from college) in 2004, it was over 700 pages long. I wrote and drew Demonology 101 for one very basic reason: I wanted to read comics that were made for me, a teenage girl who liked comics. And everywhere I looked, there were no comics for me.

            (Aside: this is actually a little unfair. Back in the very late 90s and early 00s, there were comics that I would have enjoyed a lot, had I been able to find them. Bone, by Jeff Smith, for example, or Battle Angel Alita, or Love & Rockets. However, I grew up in a small Canadian town without a good comic store, and this was before libraries had embraced graphic novels, so I had little access to comics beyond the superhero variety. I read those, but they weren't really what a socially awkward teenage girl wanted to read. Or they weren't what I wanted to read. I wanted to read Buffy the Vampire Slayer in comic form. And since there weren't any Buffy comics that I knew about, I made them myself.)

            Now it is nearly ten (!!!) years after the end of Demonology 101, and I am about to have my seventh graphic novel published. It's called Nothing Can Possibly Go Wrong, and is about two guys, Nate and Charlie, one's a geek, one's a jock, friends and rivals in a disastrous school election. Nothing Can Possibly Go Wrong has everything: over the top comedy, gestapo cheerleaders, vicious robot fights ... teenage me would have loved to read it.

            Of the seven graphic novels I've drawn (and written four of them), six have been books that some kind of teenager (I hope) would enjoy. Zombies Calling is about university students forced to battle a zombie invasion using their knowledge of zombie movie cliches. Brain Camp is about a creepy summer camp that might be doing something horrifying to the campers. Friends With Boys is about a homeschooled girl going into public high school for the first time (to keep this comic in theme with the rest of my comics, she's stalked by a ghost). For the most part, I write and draw comics for the teenager who really wants to read comics made for them. And I write and draw them for me at that age, a nerdy girl who wanted to read comics so badly that she made her own, and then made it her career.

            I read a lot of YA prose books. I think they're pretty awesome, and I love how vibrant and diverse they are. Different types of stories being told by different characters, a literal bonanza of storytelling choices. I wish for this kind of diversity in comics for teenagers as well, from deeply personal stories like The Absolutely True Diary of a Part Time Indian to fantastic adventures like The Girl of Fire and Thorns or The Scorpio Races. Comics are creeping towards the diversity of prose ever so slowly: Jeff Smith's Bone sits on the shelf with Fullmetal Alchemist by Hiromu Arakawa, Nightschool by Svetlana Chmakova and Mercury by Hope Larson, but we need more. Hopefully, years down the road, some other teenager will look at the graphic novels offered to him or her and think “these are not what I want, so I will make my own comics.” And maybe he or she will make comics their career as well. 


About the Authors:
Faith Erin Hicks
Born in the wilds of British Columbia, the young Faith frolicked among the Sasquatch native to the province before moving to Ontario at age five. There she was homeschooled with her three brothers, and developed an unnatural passion for galloping around on horseback, though never without a proper helmet (because you only get one skull). After twenty years of suffering through Ontario’s obscenely hot summers, she migrated east, and now lives beside the other ocean in Halifax, Nova Scotia. She worked in animation for a bit, and now draws comics full time. She’s not sure how that happened either.
Prudence Shen 

Giveaway:

I have one finished copy graciously given by First Second Books for giveaway to US/CA addresses. 

Giveaway ends May 20th at midnight. 
Enter using the Rafflecopter form below.

7 comments:

  1. This book sounds so fun!! Robot wars!! OMG I used to watch that show on TV and loved it. Fabulous guest post too. I love that she decided to just write her own comics since she couldn't find any that were for her.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I loved this guest post! I love the idea of creating something that you want to read, but just doesn't exist yet. Congrats to Faith on your publication!

    ReplyDelete
  3. I hope for the same kind of diversity in YA graphic novels. I've read (I think) two or three of FEH's GNs but it's exciting to me that she's written more (seven?!) that would be considered YA-appropriate. Not that I'm YA, but I like reading in that genre. I've read several YA GNs that are superhero comics but there really isn't too much out there that is proper fantasy and sci fi. I'd love to read something EPIC...but that still moves along.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Me too, Flannery. I think I need to read more graphic novels if this one works out well for me. I definitely won't be hesitant about reading them anymore!

      Delete
  4. I haven't read much graphic novels. I do want to read more of them, since I've been seeing more popular books being turn into a graphic novel. Cool!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Me too! I think I would like to read original ones though that started out in graphic novel form. I guess I just don't see the point of turning something into a comic that was once a book. Unless the person reading it just refuses to read books without pictures. I'd love to be proven wrong though.

      Delete
  5. So cool! Looks like it will be fun to read! Can't wait!

    ReplyDelete

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...